Clean Crawl Space Antioch TN

The crawl space has an integral role towards a home’s overall value as well as the living space above. Most homeowners in Antioch Nashville  don’t think twice about their crawl space unless they have to make repairs to plumbing, heating ducts or house wiring. While often thought of as no more than a storage area, it also has a tremendous impact on the overall indoor air quality of the entire home.

finished crawl space

The Best Crawl Space Repair In Antioch TN

By default, the air quality of a crawl space is typically poor. Mold, mildew, radon gas and poor energy efficiency all create several problems. The air that circulates within it eventually makes its way up through the living space. Scientific studies show that up to 50% of living space air originates from the lowest level of the home. With homeowners more concerned about their home’s indoor air quality, the encapsulating of crawl spaces has become a popular solution for such problems.

A damp crawl space creates a safe harbor for harmful molds, in addition to dust mites, termites and other bugs that can infest the home. The presence of excessive moisture will also create a serious problem with the probability for the wooden structure of a home to deteriorate. Crawl space vents pose a further problem. While believed to be a solution to moisture problems, they, unfortunately, make the problem worse. As it turns out, the vents allow cold air and moisture in, which rises into the living area and therefore decreases the heating efficiency of the entire home.

Another all-too-common problem associated with crawl spaces is radon gas. Though it cannot be seen, smelled or tasted, radon is a radioactive gas that can contribute to poor health, including cancer. Radon gas makes its way through the earth, into the crawl space and the home’s living space. According to the U.S.E.P.A., radon gas is the number one leading cause of lung cancer in non-smokers.

Ignoring these various conditions is not recommended for both long-term health and energy usage. Fully encapsulating a crawl space – by both sealing and insulating – is a fully efficient measure in addressing such problems. It makes sense to maintain and improve the lower level area in order to maximize healthy living conditions and home resale value.

While there are several systems for encapsulating, a zero perm liner system that also insulates and reflects heat provides the most benefits. With a proper floor and wall liner, the area will not only be well insulated but will seal out moisture, bug infestation, and radon gas. Other components to look for in a system include a radon gas-dispersing drain fabric, a radon gas ventilation pipe, and a ceiling heat shield.

A complete system with all of the above components will allow any soil gasses – including radon gas – that naturally occur under the liner system, to wick through the drain fabric and escape out through the ventilation pipe. While improved indoor air quality is the primary benefit of a sealed and insulated crawl space, the homeowner will also appreciate a bright, clean, and dry storage area; the ridding of musty smells; less energy usage; and tax credits. Contractors encapsulating crawl spaces will have more to offer to their clients when they can assure the peace of mind with improved indoor air quality.

dry crawl space

5 Helpful Tips For When it is Time to Encapsulate Your Crawl Space

Crawl space is one of the most fundamental areas in every home which needs to be kept extremely clean. This is the reason why people go for crawl space encapsulation kits, as these liners make your crawl space extremely clean by keeping away insects, water logging and bad odor. However, the market displays numerous encapsulation kits in different qualities.

Good quality encapsulation kits are more expensive than the cheaper ones, but the cheaper ones are much weaker when it comes to quality. Unfortunately, in my extensive experience in this industry, I have noticed that people are attracted to cheaper ones and choose them for their encapsulation. However, they regret later when the whole thing fails to deliver what it promises.

This undoubtedly is the reason why I suggest using DIY encapsulation kits to save a considerable amount of money. How? It is not only the DIY kit that is expensive, but what's more expensive are the labor charges that come along with it. Labor charges have been increasing higher than ever, and this is the reason why it costs you as much as the encapsulation kits itself. However, if you opt for using DIY encapsulation kit you can save a considerable amount of money that you might spend on labor charges.

Moreover, you can also do your encapsulation at the convenience of your time, patience and energy. You do not have to wait for the professional to arrive at your home, analyze your crawl space and then start the job. Sometimes, this may take longer than you even expect it to finish. This undisputedly becomes the reason why people are more open to taking up DIY kit, as this can finish up their crawl space encapsulation as fast as possible.

What's more? Choosing a DIY kit will help you to ascertain the quality of your liner and the credibility it comes with when protecting your home. By choosing this kit you can take your time and choose the one that suits your preferences and is a permanent solution to your problems. If you leave this to the dealer, you cannot be sure on the quality of liners they will be using and the credibility of their service.

By doing the encapsulation yourself you can be sure that you have done it perfectly and can also alter some changes according to your preference. Hiring a professional will not only take your time and money, but may not be as flexible as you may think.

Crawl space DIY kits are readily available in the market and all you need to do is to research a bit on the types available. Remember, to choose a good quality liner because it all depends on the quality of the liner when it comes to completing the protection of your house.

digging out a crawl space

A Closed, Sealed Crawlspace - What a Really Bad Idea

Outlined below are the most common 4 methods I have seen used in installing a vapor barrier. If you talk to different builders, you usually will end up with many different methods of installing a vapor barrier in a crawlspace. Here are the most common:

1. Pea Gravel on top of plastic vapor barrier - This has to be the all time dumbest thing I have ever seen, and yet it is probably one of the most common. I have had builders tell me that the plastic on the ground KEEPS ground water and moisture from coming up from the ground. Now if there is no moisture or water in the soil, this might be possible; but if that was the case there would be no need for the barrier in the first place. So here is the basic idea - ground floor (bottom) - plastic (middle) - 4" pea gravel fill (top). Once the crawl foundation is built, builders install a 4 - 6 mil plastic on the ground and dump about 4" - 6" of pea gravel on top of the plastic. Eventually, what always happens is that water comes in from the walls and the ground floor and ends up on top of the plastic. So what you end up with is a swimming pool liner that holds water in the gravel for prolonged periods of time. Nearly all the water and moisture in the gravel back fill has to evaporate into the structure. Another example of building practices and science turning a blind eye to crawlspaces for decades.

2. Vapor barrier on top of ground floor - By far the most common practice for installing a vapor barrier. A 6 mil polyethylene vapor barrier is placed over any ground floor. Here is the idea - ground floor (bottom) - plastic (top). The ground floor could be river rock, pea gravel, dirt floor, sand, etc. The seams are typically overlapped 6" - 12" and almost never taped. While this will temporarily stop some moisture evaporation, it does not seal out moisture from the internal perimeter wall where most water penetration occurs. Also moisture can come up from the seams, and the plastic is not durable enough to crawl on. It nearly always ends up with many punctures and holes in it.

3. Vapor barrier on bottom of floor joists - This is rarely seen, and usually only home owners attempt this. This is probably the method that accounts for more wood rot than any other method. If you are even thinking of doing this, quit thinking and call a professional to fix your crawlspace. Most crawlspaces are vented and the cooler surfaces such as duct work, pipes, and the floor will condensate in the summer. The plastic will trap the condensation up against the floor structure and mold and wood rot will occur. Good intentions do not always produce good results.

4. Vapor barrier fastened to sill plate - There is a new industry in crawlspace repair that encapsulates crawl spaces. The process of encapsulation is to install a heavy think plastic liner on the floor and up the foundation walls. The plastic liner is fastened and sealed to the foundation wall and all the overlapped seams are taped. Every potential gap or seam in the liner is meticulously sealed to prevent any moisture from evaporating. Then the vents are sealed in the encapsulation system to prevent hot humid air from entering in the summer. There is another system being sold and installed out there being represented as an encapsulation system, but is far from it.

This "other" system is a 6 mil plastic that is ran up the foundation walls and stapled to the sill plate. None of the overlapped seams are taped. It is basically a glorified vapor barrier on top of the ground floor being ran up the walls and stapled to the wood. They seal the vents without properly sealing the moisture from the ground floor or foundation walls. The problem with fastening plastic to the sill plate is that moisture will "wick" up the foundation wall, and moisture will absorb into the sill plate and floor joists. They are giving free access to all the moisture under the liner to rot the sill plates and floor joists. Not to mention that all the moisture will evaporate up through all of the seams that aren't taped and the plastic liner is only 6 mil and eventually will puncture and tear. Be very careful in the contractor you choose to properly encapsulate your crawlspace.


Crawl Space Masters Specializes In Crawl Space Encapsulation in Antioch TN.

http://crawlspacemasters.com/nashville/

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