Waterproofing Crawl Space Northbriar TN

The crawl space has an integral role towards a home’s overall value as well as the living space above. Most homeowners in Northbriar Chattanooga  don’t think twice about their crawl space unless they have to make repairs to plumbing, heating ducts or house wiring. While often thought of as no more than a storage area, it also has a tremendous impact on the overall indoor air quality of the entire home.

crawl space definition

The Best Waterproofing Crawl Space In Northbriar TN

By default, the air quality of a crawl space is typically poor. Mold, mildew, radon gas and poor energy efficiency all create several problems. The air that circulates within it eventually makes its way up through the living space. Scientific studies show that up to 50% of living space air originates from the lowest level of the home. With homeowners more concerned about their home’s indoor air quality, the encapsulating of crawl spaces has become a popular solution for such problems.

A damp crawl space creates a safe harbor for harmful molds, in addition to dust mites, termites and other bugs that can infest the home. The presence of excessive moisture will also create a serious problem with the probability for the wooden structure of a home to deteriorate. Crawl space vents pose a further problem. While believed to be a solution to moisture problems, they, unfortunately, make the problem worse. As it turns out, the vents allow cold air and moisture in, which rises into the living area and therefore decreases the heating efficiency of the entire home.

Another all-too-common problem associated with crawl spaces is radon gas. Though it cannot be seen, smelled or tasted, radon is a radioactive gas that can contribute to poor health, including cancer. Radon gas makes its way through the earth, into the crawl space and the home’s living space. According to the U.S.E.P.A., radon gas is the number one leading cause of lung cancer in non-smokers.

Ignoring these various conditions is not recommended for both long-term health and energy usage. Fully encapsulating a crawl space – by both sealing and insulating – is a fully efficient measure in addressing such problems. It makes sense to maintain and improve the lower level area in order to maximize healthy living conditions and home resale value.

While there are several systems for encapsulating, a zero perm liner system that also insulates and reflects heat provides the most benefits. With a proper floor and wall liner, the area will not only be well insulated but will seal out moisture, bug infestation, and radon gas. Other components to look for in a system include a radon gas-dispersing drain fabric, a radon gas ventilation pipe, and a ceiling heat shield.

A complete system with all of the above components will allow any soil gasses – including radon gas – that naturally occur under the liner system, to wick through the drain fabric and escape out through the ventilation pipe. While improved indoor air quality is the primary benefit of a sealed and insulated crawl space, the homeowner will also appreciate a bright, clean, and dry storage area; the ridding of musty smells; less energy usage; and tax credits. Contractors encapsulating crawl spaces will have more to offer to their clients when they can assure the peace of mind with improved indoor air quality.

mold in crawl space under house

Crawlspace Vapor Barrier Mythbusters

Before you sign that independent contractor agreement, consider this:

You're hungry, and you and your special someone decide to eat out. You drive down the road and find two restaurants standing next to other. From the outside, they seem about the same with one significant difference: the parking lot in front of one restaurant is nearly empty. The other restaurant? Packed! The lot is nearly full, and there's a crowd at the door. Through the restaurant windows you see smiling faces and filled tables. You pull in, and when you're greeted at the door, you're told there will be a 45 minute wait for your table. Will you leave the restaurant and go next door to the one that can serve you immediately? Isn't there a reason the other one is empty?

If you're looking for a basement waterproofing contractor to work on your home, you've got more than a bad taste in your mouth to worry about. Symptoms of a wet basement include headaches, moldy basement carpeting, wet drywall, ruined personal possessions, spreading mold, smelly basement syndrome, fatigue after hours of cleaning, and an exhausted bank account. Don't take chances on the empty business- if you reach a basement waterproofing company with a long line, there must be an awful lot of people who think they're worth the wait.

If you're not sure if the basement waterproofing contractor you've decided to work with is the best in the business, there are many ways to check out their reputation. Visit the local Better Business Bureau web site and check out their reputation- any complaints registered with them will be public for three years. Compare them with other local dealers, taking into account the size of the businesses and how many jobs has been completed for each.

It's also a good idea to check the contractor consumer web site such as Yelp! Or Angie's List. If the local contractor is registered, then reviews, company information, and ratings for quality and service will be clearly laid out as well as anecdotal accounts created by customers of this contractor will be available. There's a lot of ways online to have a customer's feelings be heard nowadays.

As a final way to check on your basement waterproofing contractor, contact them and ask for references. Many contractors will collect references from previous jobs and will be able to connect you with testimonials and contacts that will be able to give you a personal account of the quality of their service. However, whether you check with the Better Business Bureau, Angie's List, or you're checking up on references, you'll be gathering information directly from former customers about what these basement waterproofing contractors are all about.

finished crawl space

Crawlspace Vapor Barrier Mythbusters

Encapsulating a crawl space is a common way to deal with moisture or flooding. It is also an easy way to quickly get control of the air quality in the home and lock out rodents and insects. When you're thinking about "green-ovating" your home, or simply getting control of the moisture or humidity, when you have a crawl space, you must encapsulate.

Encapsulation does a great deal for the crawlspace and for the home above.

What the process is and what it does

The practice of encapsulating or "sealing off" a crawlspace is done to lock out moisture and cut off the connection between moisture, water and the joists of a home. By running a vapor barrier down the walls of a crawlspace to completely cover the floor, you essential separate the outside from the inside of the home.

This vapor barrier will be the flexible membrane between the walls and floor and the rest of the home. A properly designed vapor barrier will limit the transfer of moisture through it, while regulating the speed at which air will naturally pass through. This helps to limit and control the amount of moisture that will find its way into the air space and completely segregate liquid water and direct it to a sump location.

5 helpful tips when having a Vapor Barrier installed in your crawlspace:

1.) Not all vapor barriers are made for this task - careful. There are many products out in the world that claim to be able to fully encapsulate a crawl space. Make sure that your vapor barrier has a low "perm" rate and that it is at least 14mil thick. If you're planning to use the space for storage make sure that a flexible sub-flooring product is also placed on top of the vapor barrier to protect it.

2.) Cover the walls too - all too often contractors forget to also encapsulate the walls of the crawl space when installing a vapor barrier. This can still allow water and moisture into the basement and therefore render the whole project useless. Take care to make sure it's installed properly.

3.) Don't use sprays. - Sealants and sprays aren't designed to be applied on the interior of the basement. They are good in many circumstances as the "first line of defense" but as the last, they can't hold the pressure and moisture trapped in a wall.

4.) Install a sump and a dehumidifier - to totally control the moisture level in the crawl space it's imperative that you have a sump pump and a dehumidifier installed. Moisture will still exist, although not to dangerous levels, but a sump will remove any liquid water your encapsulation traps, and the dehumidifier will deal with any residual moisture that naturally collects in the space.

5.) Look for the right contractor - many of the contractors who specialize in this repair are also in the basement waterproofing business. These contractors, over other general contractors, are preferred because they'll have access to more robust and dependable solutions. They also have the proper training and experience to pull the project off with little effort on your part.

Encapsulating a crawl space will limit moisture and humidity in your cellar and help lower your energy costs. Limiting moisture will help to ensure that any insulation in your floor boards will be working at their peak while keeping the cost of running any air conditioning units to a bare minimum.


Crawl Space Masters Specializes In Crawl Space Encapsulation in Northbriar TN.

http://crawlspacemasters.com/chattanooga/

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