Tennessee clean crawl space

Crawl Spaces in Tennessee  have been always around, but they became increasingly popular when homeowners started to recognize the improved convenience they have. Compared to the conventional floor setups and concrete floors, crawlspaces granted easy access to the plumbing setup and air ducts, and repairing them became effortless. Moreover, crawlspaces were also used as a storage facility. However, like any good thing in the world, crawlspaces also have its fair share of problems: trapped moisture, vermin, termites, and carpenter ants; invasion of wildlife and accumulation of foul gases to name a few.

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crawl space mold Tennessee

digging out a crawl space

I’ve been doing  crawl space encapsulation in Tennessee for more than two decades now. A good number of correspondences I have addressed were always concerning the foul smell and bad odors that are generated from crawlspaces. It’s imperative to recognize the root causes behind such foul odors and we need to work on strategies that will eliminate the root causes. Crawlspace encapsulation is relatively a new technique which will help you to protect your crawl space, and the health of your family. However, you need to know how to choose the right encapsulation system for your home.

By encapsulating your crawl space, you no longer have to worry about rodents or other wild animals invading your crawl space, moisture accumulation, termites and foul smell that was haunting you for long. A Do-It-Yourself encapsulation kit will undisputedly help you to protect your home from unwanted disasters.

Crawl Space Encapsulation - Eliminate Musty Smells DIY - Mold Encapsulation

finished crawl space

There are three basic types of foundations in use today in the construction of a home.

Slab Foundations

A slab foundation is a foundation built directly on the soil with no basement or crawl space. Slab foundations are common in areas where soil conditions are not suitable for a basement, and are the most common foundation found in warmer areas such as Florida, Arizona, California and Texas, or anywhere where the depth between the soil and stable underlying rock is very shallow. Slabs are the quickest and cheapest foundation because they require less labor, skill and materials cost. They consist of a concrete slab that is typically 6 to 8 inches thick. Embedded within the slab is a grid of supporting ribbed metal rods known as "rebar." Even in locations where basements are prevalent, slab foundations are typically laid to serve as the base for structures like garages, pole barns, and sheds. Slabs are the least expensive of the three main foundation types but provide no storage or utility space, as the home actually sits directly on a large platform of solid concrete. Slabs have the disadvantage of being difficult and expensive to repair when they settle and crack, and plumbing lines that protrude from the soil upward through the concrete can also be expensive to repair. In areas where the underlying soil is thick or prone to excessive expansion and contraction, cables are embedded which can be tightened to provide better horizontal support and minimize the width of cracks.

Crawl Space (Pier and Beam) Foundations

A pier and beam foundation consists of either vertical wood or concrete columns (piers) that support beams or floor joists above the ground. The areas between the soil and the bottom of the house floor is known as the crawl space. These foundations are built either at ground level or over a shallow excavation that varies in depth, but is commonly about 36 to 40 inches deep. The best crawl space foundations have a load-bearing concrete perimeter wall and concrete or steel piers, both having footings below the freeze line of the soil, along with a good barrier over the soil to keep moisture under control. Less expensive versions have no load-bearing perimeter walls, piers with shallow footings, and no moisture barrier at all over the soil. Crawl spaces that enclosed by a wall or by skirting must have vents on every side to allow air to circulate and help keep the soil dry under the home. These vents must be configured to prevent the entry of rodents and snakes. Crawl space foundations are most often used in areas where there is heavy clay content in the soil that can severely damage (crack) slab foundations, or in waterfront or flood prone building sites where the necessary floor height to prevent water penetration of the living space must be higher than a slab can normally provide. The primary advantages of crawl space foundations are that plumbing lines are readily accessible for repairs, and foundation settlement problems are easier and less expensive to correct than with slab foundations. A primary disadvantage occurs when these foundations are not properly maintained or are constructed without adequate ventilation, allowing water or pests to cause damage. Crawl space foundations without adequate insulation applied to the bottom of the house floor can be very energy inefficient in a cold climate.

Basement Foundations

A basement is a type of foundation which includes an accessible space between the soil and the bottom of the first floor of a home. This foundation provides living space below the home, below the ground elevation. It is basically a slab foundation with walls and a floor. Basements are most often built in cold weather climates such as the Northeast, Midwest and Rocky Mountains, and in places where the cost of excavation is not prohibitive. Basements start with a hole approximately 8 feet deep, however, some homeowners will opt for a 9 or 10 foot deep basement wall to increase height and volume of useable space. The floor and walls are built, then the house itself is built over that. Basement foundations have the advantage of providing useful space for utilities, mechanicals systems, and storage not available in the previous two types of foundations. The primary disadvantage of basements is that because they are mostly below ground level, they are vulnerable to leakage, mold formation, and flooding. Basements in wet climates must always have a working drain and pump in the floor to combat flooding.

DIY Basement Foundation Repair

crawlspace mold

In recent years, the idea of indoor air quality control has become a bigger concern to the basement waterproofing industry. When I began working with the industry over 20 years ago, the idea of basement waterproofing was exclusive to the controlling of and prevention of water seepage and flooding. With homeowners becoming more aware of radon gas infiltration, moisture and mildew, and other soil gases, waterproofers have the perfect opportunity to better serve their customers by addressing such needs.

Musty smells, moisture and radon gas - all common problems in a basement and/or crawl space, are solvable by enacting some of the most basic waterproofing techniques. Improving indoor air quality, beginning from the basement and/or crawl space will impact the air quality of the entire home. Over 50 percent of the air that circulates through the home's living space originates from the basement and or crawl space. When the air quality of the basement or crawl space is poor, chances are, the entire home's air quality is poor or soon will be.

One of the first measures a contractor can do to address such concerns is by applying a sodium based silicate spray onto the basement's walls and floors. Such a spray typically reacts with the concrete's free lime, resulting in the formation of an expanded crystalline structure beneath the surface. The application of a deep-penetrating concrete sealer stops water vapor and radon gas from permeating the porous surfaces. This allows the concrete to become dense, increasing its resistance to various vapors and gases. Such sealants usually can be applied with a low-pressure hand sprayer.

When applying the right sodium based silicate spray, some of the additional advantages may include the reduction of spalling from freeze and thaw cycles; improving a concrete structure's resistance to most soils, acids, oils and salts; and protecting against efflorescence and leaching - specific results will vary pending the type of spray that is applied.

It is recommended to clean the concrete surface prior to application. Any dirt, oil or foreign substances may hinder the effectiveness of the spray. After such a spray is applied, the surface should be flushed with water before drying.

The prevention of moisture and soil gases permeating through concrete surfaces goes a long way in reducing the growth of mold and eliminating the musty smell that often plagues a basement and/or crawl space. Waterproofing contractors have always been called to address immediate water problems for the short-term; with indoor air quality control, contractors can now offer a viable long-term service that provides their customers with the ultimate peace of mind.

If you crawl space is in need of repair, Crawl Space Masters can help!