Tennessee clean crawl space

Crawl Spaces in Tennessee  have been always around, but they became increasingly popular when homeowners started to recognize the improved convenience they have. Compared to the conventional floor setups and concrete floors, crawlspaces granted easy access to the plumbing setup and air ducts, and repairing them became effortless. Moreover, crawlspaces were also used as a storage facility. However, like any good thing in the world, crawlspaces also have its fair share of problems: trapped moisture, vermin, termites, and carpenter ants; invasion of wildlife and accumulation of foul gases to name a few.

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crawl space mold Tennessee

finished crawl space

I’ve been doing  crawl space encapsulation in Tennessee for more than two decades now. A good number of correspondences I have addressed were always concerning the foul smell and bad odors that are generated from crawlspaces. It’s imperative to recognize the root causes behind such foul odors and we need to work on strategies that will eliminate the root causes. Crawlspace encapsulation is relatively a new technique which will help you to protect your crawl space, and the health of your family. However, you need to know how to choose the right encapsulation system for your home.

By encapsulating your crawl space, you no longer have to worry about rodents or other wild animals invading your crawl space, moisture accumulation, termites and foul smell that was haunting you for long. A Do-It-Yourself encapsulation kit will undisputedly help you to protect your home from unwanted disasters.

Proper Crawl Space Ventilation Can Improve Living Space Air Quality Inside Your Home

digging out a crawl space

Owning a home with a basement can give us additional living space that is not typically available in a home with a crawl space. Many people put recreational rooms in the basement as well as using them for storage and often as a personal workshop. It may be difficult, however, whenever water in the basement becomes a problem. There are really two different ways in which water can invade this area of our home, both of which will take some form of waterproofing to correct. They can either come in slowly, almost undetected by us or it can quickly invade our basement and cause it to be flooded.

Since the basement is below ground level, moisture is often a problem, even if it is not visible. It may show up as mold or mildew that begins to appear on the walls and although you cannot actually see the moisture that is present, there are plenty of telltale signs that will help to identify the fact that you have a problem.

Doing a little bit of basement waterproofing for this usually means putting a specific type of paint on the walls or perhaps even spraying them down with chemicals so that they are impervious to mold growth. It may also help if you run a basement dehumidifier on a regular basis, even after you have completed the basement waterproofing project.

The other way that water can invade our basement is all at one time which can cause it to be flooded. I have personally had a difficulty with this for many years and it can be destructive, especially if you use the basement for living space or storage. If the water is coming in at one specific location, sealing that location in some way or another may help to cure the problem a little bit.

There may be times, however, whenever more drastic measures need to be taken. If you're basement floods on a regular basis, you may need to dig down to the bottom of your foundation on the outside of the walls and install a French drain. This will divert any water away from the house so that it does not end up in your basement.

Having a problem with water in your basement is simply keeping you from enjoying part of your house. Although waterproofing your basement is going to take a little bit of work, it will all be well worth the effort whenever you can take this part of your home back again.

Crawl Space Vapor Barrier Basics

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A basement is prone to all types of foundation issues like, cracks in the interior and exterior walls, leaks, soil pressure, excessive moisture, seepage and dampness. These problems get worse over time and cause long term damage to your home, if left untreated. In order to enhance the structural integrity of your home, it is very important to take professional help for basement foundation repair. A professional will ensure that the problem is resolved efficiently.

Many properties experience foundation issues at some or the other time and it is important to know how severe the problem is to look for a treatment that offers a permanent solution. A basement foundation repair can be easily done if you have basic information about the ways to handle such repairs. There are various methods of repairing the foundation of a home. If there is some serious damage, it is advisable to take professional help. For general maintenance, you can either go for mortar application or patching repairs.

Some indications which suggest that you should go for basement foundation repair includes:

- Uneven Floors
- Water collection
- Cracks at entry or exit doors
- Doors not closing or opening properly

Cracks are the most common type of foundation maintenance issues. They are usually found in older basements and are caused due to the changes in the soil below the basement. Shallow foundations are more prone to cracks.

How To Clean Cracks

Once you have identified cracks in the foundation, you need to first clean them comprehensively. Cleaning is important as it not only helps in knowing the type of repair required, but also helps in proper application of the adhesive material. You can use a chisel to remove loose fragments from the cracks and then inspect it to find the right repair method.

If the cracks have just begun to show, you can use either hydraulic cement or Portland mortar to seal the cracks. These materials come with easy to follow instructions and can also be used to resolve any visible unevenness along the basement floor.

If your basement foundation is facing standing water problem, the moisture seepage can cause cracks in the drywall. To patch the leaky spots is the most effective solution for dealing with this problem.

To ensure that repeated basement foundation repairs are not needed, the groundwater should be directed away from the foundation.

A professional basement foundation repair company can be hired to repair foundation cracks, basement walls, stabilize the foundation, install foundation guard, repair eroded, bowed or unstable walls and remove mold problems. A strong basement foundation increases the value of your home.

If you crawl space is in need of repair, Crawl Space Masters can help!


encapsulate crawl space cost Tennessee, Tennessee

The crawl space has an integral role towards a home’s overall value as well as the living space above. Most homeowners in Tennessee Tennessee  don’t think twice about their crawl space unless they have to make repairs to plumbing, heating ducts or house wiring. While often thought of as no more than a storage area, it also has a tremendous impact on the overall indoor air quality of the entire home.

crawl space drainage

The Best crawl space mold In Tennessee TN

By default, the air quality of a crawl space is typically poor. Mold, mildew, radon gas and poor energy efficiency all create several problems. The air that circulates within it eventually makes its way up through the living space. Scientific studies show that up to 50% of living space air originates from the lowest level of the home. With homeowners more concerned about their home’s indoor air quality, the encapsulating of crawl spaces has become a popular solution for such problems.

A damp crawl space creates a safe harbor for harmful molds, in addition to dust mites, termites and other bugs that can infest the home. The presence of excessive moisture will also create a serious problem with the probability for the wooden structure of a home to deteriorate. Crawl space vents pose a further problem. While believed to be a solution to moisture problems, they, unfortunately, make the problem worse. As it turns out, the vents allow cold air and moisture in, which rises into the living area and therefore decreases the heating efficiency of the entire home.

Another all-too-common problem associated with crawl spaces is radon gas. Though it cannot be seen, smelled or tasted, radon is a radioactive gas that can contribute to poor health, including cancer. Radon gas makes its way through the earth, into the crawl space and the home’s living space. According to the U.S.E.P.A., radon gas is the number one leading cause of lung cancer in non-smokers.

Ignoring these various conditions is not recommended for both long-term health and energy usage. Fully encapsulating a crawl space – by both sealing and insulating – is a fully efficient measure in addressing such problems. It makes sense to maintain and improve the lower level area in order to maximize healthy living conditions and home resale value.

While there are several systems for encapsulating, a zero perm liner system that also insulates and reflects heat provides the most benefits. With a proper floor and wall liner, the area will not only be well insulated but will seal out moisture, bug infestation, and radon gas. Other components to look for in a system include a radon gas-dispersing drain fabric, a radon gas ventilation pipe, and a ceiling heat shield.

A complete system with all of the above components will allow any soil gasses – including radon gas – that naturally occur under the liner system, to wick through the drain fabric and escape out through the ventilation pipe. While improved indoor air quality is the primary benefit of a sealed and insulated crawl space, the homeowner will also appreciate a bright, clean, and dry storage area; the ridding of musty smells; less energy usage; and tax credits. Contractors encapsulating crawl spaces will have more to offer to their clients when they can assure the peace of mind with improved indoor air quality.

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Basement Waterproofing Contractors - Make Sure They're Busy

Crawl Spaces have been always around, but they became increasingly popular when homeowners started to recognize the improved convenience they have. Compared to the conventional floor setups and concrete floors, crawlspaces granted easy access to the plumbing setup and air ducts, and repairing them became effortless. Moreover, crawlspaces were also used as a storage facility. However, like any good thing in the world, crawlspaces also have its fair share of problems: trapped moisture, vermin, termites, and carpenter ants; invasion of wildlife and accumulation of foul gases to name a few.

I've been doing crawl space encapsulation business for more than two decades now. A good number of correspondences I have addressed were always concerning the foul smell and bad odors that are generated from crawlspaces. It's imperative to recognize the root causes behind such foul odors and we need to work on strategies that will eliminate the root causes. Crawlspace encapsulation is relatively a new technique which will help you to protect your crawl space, and the health of your family. However, you need to know how to choose the right encapsulation system for your home.

By encapsulating your crawl space, you no longer have to worry about rodents or other wild animals invading your crawl space, moisture accumulation, termites and foul smell that was haunting you for long. A Do-It-Yourself encapsulation kit will undisputedly help you to protect your home from unwanted disasters.

Choosing the Right Crawl Space Encapsulation System: Things to Look For:

There are four potential threats for your crawl space: mold, water, rodents and other animals. Foul smell is a result of all these elements. Your crawl space is the natural source of fresh air but when odor is generated in this area, the fresh air entering your home will also be affected. By eliminating the root causes of odor, you can significantly improve the air quality in your home.

  • Liner: I receive several phone calls from disappointed customers who spent their hard-earned money on thin liners because some store owner advised them to do so. However, any liner material without 0.000 permeability and at least 20mil thickness won't help you to encapsulate the system and prevent water and radon gas entering your home.
  • Water: You need a waterproof encapsulation because this will help you to prevent rain water or any other source of running water entering your crawlspace. Moreover, this will also help you to bring down the moisture level, which is a good initiative in making your crawl space unsuitable for rodents and mold.
  • Dehumidifier: If you install the proper liner system, the need for a dehumidifier is greatly reduced as the purpose of removing moisture. The reason being, that a proper liner system will stop the water or moisture before it gets into the home or crawlspace, thus eliminating the need for a dehumidifier.
  • Mold Neutralizer: Dehumidifiers can prevent mold growth to a large extent, but mold neutralizer destroys bacteria, algae and mold and also prevents their future growth.

These are some important factors to be considered when installing an encapsulation system for your home. You also need to consider the warranty & price offered by your store owner. Maintaining your home can be expensive, but by investing in professional encapsulating systems that will protect your home for several decades, you're making a wise investment.

finished crawl space

A Vapor Barrier in Your Crawlspace is a Healthy Addition For Your Family

If you get three general contractors together and the topic of discussion turns crawlspaces and moisture control, you will probably hear six opinions. Even the experts seem to have different and often conflicting opinions about what tack is the best to take.

There has been much research on crawlspace encapsulation during the past decade. The US Environmental Protection Agency, the US Department of Energy, the ZEBRAlliance at Oak Ridge National Laboratories, and a non-profit research organization called Advanced Energy have all done excellent and groundbreaking research in the area of crawlspace encapsulation. Their research findings were instrumental in the last revision of the International Building Code. They all agree in a few, very important areas.

When considering your home, think of it as a single system. Your HVAC system, insulation, windows, attic, living space, and crawl space all work together. All of these building components need to be optimized and balanced to achieve maximum comfort, performance and energy efficiency. Your crawlspace is an important part of this system.

Your house is like a giant chimney. By natural convection, air is drawn in through crawlspace vents and air leaks. Because warm air rises, the outside air is drawn through the living space (along with mold spores, odors, and moisture) and exhausted through the attic. In the summer, your crawlspace is naturally cooler than the ambient outside temperature. So when the warm, humid outside air reaches the cooler crawlspace surface areas, the moisture condenses on framing, plumbing, wiring, insulation and especially HVAC ductwork and "sweats", just like an iced tea glass sweats on your kitchen table in the summer. In the southeast it is not unheard of for crawlspace humidity to approach 100% and actually rain inside the crawlspace.

The moisture in your crawlspace creates an ideal environment for wood destroying organisms, mold, and mildew. It can saturate and destroy the effectiveness of your insulation and promote wood rot. And because of the chimney effect, the humid crawlspace air, full of mold and mildew spores, eventually finds its way into your living space creating an unhealthy environment and causing your air conditioning to work overtime to dehumidify the air. Just a vapor barrier might help a bit, but most of the moisture is coming from outside, not your dirt, crawlspace floor.

So, the alternative to a vented crawlspace is an encapsulated (sealed) crawlspace. Crawlspace encapsulation involves sealing all outside vents, installing a high-performance vapor retarder on all exposed wall and floor surfaces at or below grade, insulating the walls and rim joist, and conditioning the air.

The prevailing research claims that by insulating the walls and rim joist, it is unnecessary to insulate the floor. However, if the existing floor insulation is in good condition, leave it in place. We generally recommend a rigid foam board insulation that is fire-retardant, low VOC, and offers an R-13 value or greater. It cuts easily and can be used for sealing existing crawlspace vents too. The sill plate should be caulked and paper-faced fiberglass insulation is used to insulate the rim joist.

The building codes in most areas require the air in an encapsulated crawlspace to be conditioned. That generally means adding a dehumidifier or using the existing HVAC system to condition the air. The EPA and the Department of Energy recommend using the existing HVAC system at a rate of one cubic foot per minute of conditioned air per fifty square feet of crawlspace area. A qualified HVAC contractor can add one or two 4" or 6" vents to a system for a nominal cost. The vents are usually equipped with a butterfly valve that can be adjusted to get the desired air flow.

We prefer using this method since the installation of the vents is generally less expensive than a crawlspace dehumidifier. And since running a dehumidifier is about the same as running a small refrigerator, the cost of conditioning the air with an HVAC system is generally less than running a dehumidifier. Remember that you're not trying to heat and cool your crawlspace; you're just adding a small amount of conditioned air. A relative humidity target of 60% or lower is a good place to start.

When comparing high performance vapor barriers, look at puncture and tear resistance. Other than being absolutely water tight, a high performance vapor barrier should also be flexible, fire resistant, low VOC, and lightweight. There is a world of difference between the 6 mil vapor barrier material sold in most hardware stores and a high performance specialty product. Most reputable suppliers will provide samples.

In addition to dramatically increasing indoor air quality and protecting the structure of your home, several research studies from Advanced Energy indicate that crawlspace encapsulation can actually lower energy usage. These studies were done in several parts of the country with varying climates.


Crawl Space Masters Specializes In Crawl Space Encapsulation in Tennessee TN.

http://crawlspacemasters.com/tennessee/