Knoxville Crawl Space Remediation

Crawl Spaces in Knoxville  have been always around, but they became increasingly popular when homeowners started to recognize the improved convenience they have. Compared to the conventional floor setups and concrete floors, crawlspaces granted easy access to the plumbing setup and air ducts, and repairing them became effortless. Moreover, crawlspaces were also used as a storage facility. However, like any good thing in the world, crawlspaces also have its fair share of problems: trapped moisture, vermin, termites, and carpenter ants; invasion of wildlife and accumulation of foul gases to name a few.

sealed crawl space cost

Crawl Space Remediation Knoxville

cost to install vapor barrier in crawl space

I’ve been doing  crawl space encapsulation in Knoxville for more than two decades now. A good number of correspondences I have addressed were always concerning the foul smell and bad odors that are generated from crawlspaces. It’s imperative to recognize the root causes behind such foul odors and we need to work on strategies that will eliminate the root causes. Crawlspace encapsulation is relatively a new technique which will help you to protect your crawl space, and the health of your family. However, you need to know how to choose the right encapsulation system for your home.

By encapsulating your crawl space, you no longer have to worry about rodents or other wild animals invading your crawl space, moisture accumulation, termites and foul smell that was haunting you for long. A Do-It-Yourself encapsulation kit will undisputedly help you to protect your home from unwanted disasters.

Crawlspace Vapor Barrier Mythbusters

dry crawl space

A crawl space dig out is the process of turning your crawl space into a basement. This vastly increases storage space and can, in some cases, increase living space as well.

But, a crawl space dig out can be an enormous and daunting task. And, if done improperly, it can be dangerous. If you don't want to have a professional do it for you, please follow the steps below.

To get started, find place in the outside wall of your crawl space that you can safely enter the new basement with a temporary or permanent set of steps. Make sure the wall opening is big enough to handle at least a 36-inch door, preferably making the area for the steps at least 48-inches wide.

Warning:

If your soil is sandy or gravel and or may be full of water at least part of the year do not consider this procedure, it is very dangerous and you may damage or lose your house.

Make sure that prior to digging the hole for the outside exit, please build a header of sufficient size to hold the floor of the home where you will be removing the old foundation.

You need to excavate to a depth that will accommodate a four-inch concrete slab and still have at least 7-foot, 6-inches of clearance under your floor joist. It is entirely possible that you will have 48 inches of soil to remove.

When digging out a crawl space, you can not excavate any closer than 24 inches away from the existing foundation.

You can remove the soil sufficiently to work along the wall without removing the entire area you wish to change.

When you get the soil out to a depth that you prefer, pour a footer that is eight inches thick and 16 inches wide. The footer should be below the bottom of the new slab so it is a good idea to dig the area for the footer below the level you remove for the floor area. This is a very important step in a crawl space dig out.

Then, when your block is level with bottom of the old foundation wall you need to pour a four-inch thick slab of concrete on top of the wall and over to the outside existing wall.

Prior to pouring your "Cap" you must fill between the block and soil that is under the old foundation with fill sand or "Pea-gravel." Assuming that you probably have some kind of support under the center section of the floor system, you will have to provide support for the beam that is presently supporting the floor while excavate for a new footer for a steel post that will hold the floor of your new space.

Make sure your footer for this part of the project is about eight inches thick & 24 inches square.

You will need to level the floor area for your new slab and install four inches of perforated plastic pipe draining to a sub pit with an automatic sub pump that dispenses the water to the outside at least five to ten feet away from the foundation of the home. I'd suggest using "Pea-gravel" for fill under the slab but you can you fill sand also.

Now, build your stairs to the outside in a similar fashion but you need to cover it with a steel "pre-fab" unit such as a "BILCO."

If you do this correctly and maintain it, it will last for many, many years. It is strongly suggested you get a professional to do this job or at least help with it because mistakes can be dangerous and very costly.

Thinking Long-Term Safety & Health With Proper Foundation Structural Repair & Basement Waterproofing

crawl space conversion

There are advantages and disadvantages in having a crawl space under your home. Advantages, perhaps, a slightly elevated home may be more attractive than a home on a slab. Plus, you can make repairs and modifications to plumbing, heating, and electrical services.

Disadvantages, a crawl space is an area that is never cleaned. Under the vapor barrier the humidity is always 100% so mold and bacteria are always present. Termiticides, other chemicals, even rodent droppings may be present, and odors and gases that emanate will migrate into the home's living space unless proper ventilation is installed. Whether on a slab or elevated, if radon is present, good ventilation is required.

There are several technologies on the market in regard to moisture control. One is encapsulation, sealing the crawlspace. Though this might lower humidity, it's costly and there is no dilution or replacement of stagnant, poor quality air. Again, if radon is present, ventilation is required.

Another technology is to install a dehumidifier in the crawl space. This can lower humidity, but again will not dilute or replace the stagnant air. Another point to think about is that the dehumidifier will be costly to operate. More importantly, using a dehumidifier requires you to close tightly the crawl space. Thus, the home's living space air quality is going to be lowered because the crawl space air is not diluted and replaced with fresh outdoor air.

Some systems use a dehumidifier control (dehumidistat) to operate a crawl space vent fan. This sounds like it's going in the right direction. However, the technology isn't quite right. Here's why. Suppose the outdoor air is getting worse (wetter). Though the dehumidistat control is in the crawl space, it will quickly recognize this wetter air condition and begin ventilation, even though ventilating is going to make crawl space wetter. Another problem with a dehumidistat control is that most of them are not made for the difficult environment of a crawl space, so their warranties are short, 30 days to 1 year maximum for the dehumidistat.

There is another system that uses special technology different from all the others mentioned above. This special technology makes a comparison of the actual moisture content of both the air inside the crawlspace and the outdoor air. The result is that it pauses and does not ventilate when bringing in outdoor air is going to make the space wetter. Then, as the outdoor air is getting drier and is able to improve the moisture and air quality in the crawlspace, then this ventilator moves a lot of air which dilutes and replaces stagnant air, ultimately improving your home's living space air quality.

This system, called the Smartvent, is made in the USA, is used from Florida to Alaska... San Diego to Nova Scotia.

This system is a proven system, and it is the only system to have undergone a year long test where crawl space humidity averaged 46%. Besides the unique technology this system employs, it also has the longest warranty of all ventilators, five years.

If you crawl space is in need of repair, Crawl Space Masters can help!