crawl space mold Morristown, Tennessee

The crawl space has an integral role towards a home’s overall value as well as the living space above. Most homeowners in Morristown Tennessee  don’t think twice about their crawl space unless they have to make repairs to plumbing, heating ducts or house wiring. While often thought of as no more than a storage area, it also has a tremendous impact on the overall indoor air quality of the entire home.

finished crawl space

The Best crawl space water In Morristown TN

By default, the air quality of a crawl space is typically poor. Mold, mildew, radon gas and poor energy efficiency all create several problems. The air that circulates within it eventually makes its way up through the living space. Scientific studies show that up to 50% of living space air originates from the lowest level of the home. With homeowners more concerned about their home’s indoor air quality, the encapsulating of crawl spaces has become a popular solution for such problems.

A damp crawl space creates a safe harbor for harmful molds, in addition to dust mites, termites and other bugs that can infest the home. The presence of excessive moisture will also create a serious problem with the probability for the wooden structure of a home to deteriorate. Crawl space vents pose a further problem. While believed to be a solution to moisture problems, they, unfortunately, make the problem worse. As it turns out, the vents allow cold air and moisture in, which rises into the living area and therefore decreases the heating efficiency of the entire home.

Another all-too-common problem associated with crawl spaces is radon gas. Though it cannot be seen, smelled or tasted, radon is a radioactive gas that can contribute to poor health, including cancer. Radon gas makes its way through the earth, into the crawl space and the home’s living space. According to the U.S.E.P.A., radon gas is the number one leading cause of lung cancer in non-smokers.

Ignoring these various conditions is not recommended for both long-term health and energy usage. Fully encapsulating a crawl space – by both sealing and insulating – is a fully efficient measure in addressing such problems. It makes sense to maintain and improve the lower level area in order to maximize healthy living conditions and home resale value.

While there are several systems for encapsulating, a zero perm liner system that also insulates and reflects heat provides the most benefits. With a proper floor and wall liner, the area will not only be well insulated but will seal out moisture, bug infestation, and radon gas. Other components to look for in a system include a radon gas-dispersing drain fabric, a radon gas ventilation pipe, and a ceiling heat shield.

A complete system with all of the above components will allow any soil gasses – including radon gas – that naturally occur under the liner system, to wick through the drain fabric and escape out through the ventilation pipe. While improved indoor air quality is the primary benefit of a sealed and insulated crawl space, the homeowner will also appreciate a bright, clean, and dry storage area; the ridding of musty smells; less energy usage; and tax credits. Contractors encapsulating crawl spaces will have more to offer to their clients when they can assure the peace of mind with improved indoor air quality.

digging out a crawl space

Crawl Space Repair Without a Fan or Vent

I recently came across a Consumer Reports article that served as a good reminder to homeowners about some of the home's maintenance issues that are just too important to put off. With today's economy, it is easier to justify holding off on repairing a leaking basement wall crack because it seemingly does not pose an immediate threat, outside of a little inconvenience, of course.

Problems related to the foundation's structural stability or the indoor air quality of the home requires more immediate action; such issues are essentially putting the health and overall safety of the family at risk: not tomorrow, or a year from now, but at this moment.

While bad news for the homeowner, such problems are good for basement waterproofing and foundation repair contractors - the need for their services will always exist. The Consumer Reports article lists a couple of problem issues that the homeowner should be concerned about - the growth of mold and mildew and the formation of cracks in poured foundations. As a business owner who works with the basement waterproofing industry, these are two areas of concern that I am well familiar with.

The growth of mold and mildew can occur inside a home for endless reasons. The most prominent areas are basements and crawl spaces, where excess moisture is a sure bet unless the necessary measures are taken. Concrete walls are prone to the seepage of water vapor - leaking water from cracks in the foundation or the floor adds to the problem. The basement and crawl space provides the ideal environment for trapped moisture to eventually grow into mold spores and mildew.

Concrete cracks in poured foundation walls usually occur as a result of shrinkage or settling around the foundation. Cracks forming as a result of shrinkage in the concrete typically do not pose a structural threat, yet they may cause headaches for the homeowner the second they begin to leak water.

Whether such foundation cracks are structural or not, it is best not to leave them exposed for long, as it relates to the concern of the home's indoor air quality. These cracks, as well as in concrete floors, may provide an opening for soil gases. The infiltration of soil gases, in addition to the growth of mold and mildew can be enough to create an indoor air quality nightmare. The bad air circulating inside the basement and crawl space affects the entire home - 50% of the air circulating throughout the home originates from the home's lowest level.

Concrete cracking is unavoidable. Properly addressing them early on will minimize further problems down the road. Further indoor air quality concerns may also be addressed by implementing the proper waterproofing and sealing techniques throughout the basement and crawl space. There are plenty of qualified contractors throughout the United States and Canada available to service such jobs.

It's reassuring to know that our message is backed up by an objective source such as the Consumer Reports. You view the article at the provided link, http://shopping.yahoo.com/articles/yshoppingarticles/418/5-home-repairs-not-to-ignore/.

You can't put a price on the long-term stability of the home and health of the family.

crawlspacerepair com

Basement Finishing Ideas For The Do-It-Yourselfer

There are three basic types of foundations in use today in the construction of a home.

Slab Foundations

A slab foundation is a foundation built directly on the soil with no basement or crawl space. Slab foundations are common in areas where soil conditions are not suitable for a basement, and are the most common foundation found in warmer areas such as Florida, Arizona, California and Texas, or anywhere where the depth between the soil and stable underlying rock is very shallow. Slabs are the quickest and cheapest foundation because they require less labor, skill and materials cost. They consist of a concrete slab that is typically 6 to 8 inches thick. Embedded within the slab is a grid of supporting ribbed metal rods known as "rebar." Even in locations where basements are prevalent, slab foundations are typically laid to serve as the base for structures like garages, pole barns, and sheds. Slabs are the least expensive of the three main foundation types but provide no storage or utility space, as the home actually sits directly on a large platform of solid concrete. Slabs have the disadvantage of being difficult and expensive to repair when they settle and crack, and plumbing lines that protrude from the soil upward through the concrete can also be expensive to repair. In areas where the underlying soil is thick or prone to excessive expansion and contraction, cables are embedded which can be tightened to provide better horizontal support and minimize the width of cracks.

Crawl Space (Pier and Beam) Foundations

A pier and beam foundation consists of either vertical wood or concrete columns (piers) that support beams or floor joists above the ground. The areas between the soil and the bottom of the house floor is known as the crawl space. These foundations are built either at ground level or over a shallow excavation that varies in depth, but is commonly about 36 to 40 inches deep. The best crawl space foundations have a load-bearing concrete perimeter wall and concrete or steel piers, both having footings below the freeze line of the soil, along with a good barrier over the soil to keep moisture under control. Less expensive versions have no load-bearing perimeter walls, piers with shallow footings, and no moisture barrier at all over the soil. Crawl spaces that enclosed by a wall or by skirting must have vents on every side to allow air to circulate and help keep the soil dry under the home. These vents must be configured to prevent the entry of rodents and snakes. Crawl space foundations are most often used in areas where there is heavy clay content in the soil that can severely damage (crack) slab foundations, or in waterfront or flood prone building sites where the necessary floor height to prevent water penetration of the living space must be higher than a slab can normally provide. The primary advantages of crawl space foundations are that plumbing lines are readily accessible for repairs, and foundation settlement problems are easier and less expensive to correct than with slab foundations. A primary disadvantage occurs when these foundations are not properly maintained or are constructed without adequate ventilation, allowing water or pests to cause damage. Crawl space foundations without adequate insulation applied to the bottom of the house floor can be very energy inefficient in a cold climate.

Basement Foundations

A basement is a type of foundation which includes an accessible space between the soil and the bottom of the first floor of a home. This foundation provides living space below the home, below the ground elevation. It is basically a slab foundation with walls and a floor. Basements are most often built in cold weather climates such as the Northeast, Midwest and Rocky Mountains, and in places where the cost of excavation is not prohibitive. Basements start with a hole approximately 8 feet deep, however, some homeowners will opt for a 9 or 10 foot deep basement wall to increase height and volume of useable space. The floor and walls are built, then the house itself is built over that. Basement foundations have the advantage of providing useful space for utilities, mechanicals systems, and storage not available in the previous two types of foundations. The primary disadvantage of basements is that because they are mostly below ground level, they are vulnerable to leakage, mold formation, and flooding. Basements in wet climates must always have a working drain and pump in the floor to combat flooding.


Crawl Space Masters Specializes In Crawl Space Encapsulation in Morristown TN.

http://crawlspacemasters.com/tennessee/